Dr. Tim Downs Named Provost & Chief Academic Officer

May 6, 2014  |  by Michael Freedman

Tim Downs, Ph.D.

Tim Downs, Ph.D.

Timothy M. Downs, Ph.D., has been named provost and chief academic officer at Niagara University. The appointment was announced by the Rev. James J. Maher, C.M., president of the university.

Dr. Downs had been serving as vice president for academic affairs at Niagara since June 2011.

“This new title reflects the accomplishments of Dr. Downs, and also befits the outstanding scholarship, teaching and service of our faculty that was grown and developed under the tenure of Dr. Bonnie Rose and has continued to rise to excellence under the leadership of Dr. Downs,” said Father Maher.

As provost and chief academic officer, Dr. Downs strives to advance the university to new levels of academic excellence, expand the diversity and scope of its programs and student populations, and increase its national and international profile. He works with Niagara’s president and senior leadership team to foster an outstanding educational experience that integrates liberal arts and professional studies in distinctive ways that advance the university’s Catholic and Vincentian mission.

Prior to joining NU, Dr. Downs had served as dean of the College of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences at Gannon University (Erie, Pa.). He has also held the positions of dean of graduate studies and research at Emporia State University (Emporia, Kan.) and assistant vice president for academic affairs at California State University, Los Angeles.

Dr. Downs earned a B.A. in communication studies from California State University, Sacramento, an M.A. in communication studies from West Virginia University, and his Ph.D. in organizational communication from the University of Oklahoma.

In 2007, Dr. Downs was selected as a Summer Fellow of the Higher Education Management Institute at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College, a program designed to enable participants to make decisions for their home organizations that are grounded in theory and supported by data.